Fly Fishing Washington Steelhead: Swinging For Lightning

This video popped up in my news feed today and while my attention span is less than that of a goldfish I had to spend the 11 minutes to watch this piece by Todd Moen. While this fishing video was not all action, like the millions of others on the web, it captured the reality of swinging flies for Steelhead on the Olympic Peninsula.

The OP still remains one of my favorite places to fish for Steelhead. The lush scenery paired with beautiful rivers is tough to match, you also do not need a passport to get there. We used to do an annual fly fishing trip to the OP to visit our friends at Brazdas Fly Fishing but over the past few years life has gotten hectic and our group couldn’t commit to the trip. This is the time of year when images of chrome bright fish start to fill my news feed, I long for the smell of the rainforest. This video brought back a lot of fond memories of my weeks in Forks, WA. Maybe this will be the year that I finally give in to my desire and set responsibilities aside for a week.

If you have never experienced fly fishing for Steelhead there is no better place to cut your teeth other than Washington’s Olympic Peninsula. It will surely test your patients and psyche but can be incredibly rewarding in a blink of an eye. Take a look at this video segment and get the feel of what it is like to stand in a glacial river in the pouring rain waiting to strike lightning.

Fish of the Week!

Due to popular demand, Colorado Fly Fishing Reports has been asked to post weekly fish of the week! With so many fishes out there, it is truly fascinating as a Modern Fly-Fisherman to dream about all the possible angling destinations and fish species in the world!

Barramundi!

Barramundi!

This week’s fish of the week is the barramundi or Asian sea bass (Lates calcarifer) is a species of catadromous fish.  The species is widely distributed from Southeast Asia to Papau New Guinea and Northern Australia. Known in Thai Language as pla kapong, it is very popular in Thai Cuisine.

A lunker for sure!

A lunker for sure!

Barramundi inhabit coastal waters, estuaries, lagoons, and rivers; they are found in clear to turbid water, usually within a temperature range of 26−30 °C. This species does not undertake extensive migrations within or between river systems, which has presumably influenced establishment of genetically distinct stocks in Northern Australia.

Thanks to Colorado fly fishing guide, George Gumerman for awesome Barramundi on the fly photos!

Thanks to Colorado fly fishing guide, George Gumerman for awesome Barramundi on the fly photos!

Highly prized by anglers for their good fighting ability, barramundi are reputed to be good at avoiding fixed nets and are best caught on lines and with lures. Fly-fishing for barramundi is highly possible but generally a new frontier for fly anglers.

Tight Lines,

Colorado Fly Fishing Reports

Fishing Dog with a Blog, Part II

To get the most out of your fishing dog and “good luck” charm, the key is to get your pup acclimated to the water and riding in the boat at a young age.  This will be much easier to accomplish when your pup is little and not a 80 pound two year old thrashing around the oars!

fishing dog

“Powder”learning the finer points of rowing a boat…

"Mend that drift!" says Powder

“Mend that drift!” says Powder

There's nothing like nailing a big brown on a streamer while drifting Colorado's Roaring Fork!

There’s nothing like nailing a big brown on a streamer while drifting Colorado’s Roaring Fork!

Neil says, "Thumbs Up Dude!"

Neil says, “Thumbs Up Dude!”

Have a fun & safe weekend on the water!

Tight Lines,

Colorado Fly Fishing Reports

Outdoor Survival: How Prepared Are You?

Being prepared for the outdoors should not be taken lightly and as a guide you should be well prepared for any trip. Personally I thought that if I had a first aid kit, some extra clothes and some provisions I was ready for anything that might happen on a day trip to the river. Recently I got registered to guide fly fishing trips in remote areas in another state. This proved to be one of the most difficult tests I ever had to pass for guiding. But it made me realize that a lot can go wrong in the wilderness and that maybe I wasn’t as prepared as I thought I was. Here are a few preparation tips to consider if you are a guide or if you are getting guided.

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Symptoms: Learn the symptoms/signs of health conditions such as; Shock, Hypothermia, Diabetes, Heat Stroke/ Dehydration, Cold Water Immersion. It is important to know how to handle a situation if one of your clients experiences these symptoms. It is also important to ask if your client(s) has any type of health condition during your trip briefing.

CPR/First Aid: Every guide needs to be certified in CPR & First Aid. Knowing how to preform these basic life saving techniques can make the difference between someone living or dying.

Supplies: First Aid Kits, Water, Food & Clothing are all good basics to have with you during a trip. One of the more important items to carry are waterproof matches. These will help you create a fire quickly should you need to heat up a client who has mild hypothermia symptoms. Whistles are another item that should be carried/provided to clients. This will allow you and clients to make loud noise should you become separated in the the woods or on the river.

Trip Briefing: This is one of the most important steps when taking anyone on a guided trips. Ask questions about health, physical condition, allergies and limitations. This will allow you to make a good decision on where to bring you clients based on their requirements. It will also allow you to prepare more extensively for a client with health conditions.

Take the time this winter to educate yourself on how to be prepared for a catastrophic event in the outdoors. You will be surprised on the amount of information online that can better prepare you for an unfortunate event.

International Sportsman’s Expo comes to Denver January 12-15

Looking for something to do this weekend? Join The International Sportsman’s Expo to celebrate for the 40th year in Colorado. More than 525 exhibiting companies offering gear…expertise and travel adventures. 125+ free seminars. Expert-led clinics. Archery, casting and a new elk-calling contest. And check out the giant Youth Activity Center, hosted by Colorado Parks and Wildlife.

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Location: Colorado Convention Center
 700 14th Street
 Denver, CO 80202

Hours

Thu 12 11am – 8pm
Fri 13 11am – 8pm
Sat 14 10am – 8pm
Sun 15 10am – 5pm

 Tickets

Adult Admission – $17.00
 Youth under 16 – Free!

 No Pets
 No Weapons, Firearms or Ammunition

Parking

Parking & Shuttles: $5 per car at Park Ave. & Wazee (near Coors Field). Limited wheelchair and scooter rental available at UPS Business Center

Tight Lines,

Colorado Fly Fishing Reports

Colorado Fly Fishing Reports Invites You to The Fly Fishing Show!

Well, we hope you have enjoyed your Holidays and are settled back into “The Grind.” Winter is in full swing in Colorado, with temperatures at a high of only 10 degrees today! The weekend is fast approaching and with the colder temps it might be a good weekend to leave the river to the trout, ducks & geese and instead head downtown to The Fly Fishing Show!

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The show is a great place to get deals on the latest and greatest fly fishing gear, enter a raffle to win a trip to your dream fly fishing destination or just grab a cold beer and hang out and talk fishing. Here is the info you need this weekend:

Show Hours Friday 10am-6pm, Saturday 9am – 5:30pm, Sunday 9am – 4:30 pm

Admission is cash only at the gate and a one-day pass is only $15. Back again this year is the International Fly Fishing Film Festival, one night only Friday January 6th at 6:30 PM, $15 ticket.

If you can't be on the river this weekend, why not join us for swapping lies & stories at The Fly Fishing Show?

If you can’t be on the river this weekend, why not join us for swapping lies & stories at The Fly Fishing Show?

The show is a great place to learn from authors, outfitters, fly-fishing guides and fly tiers. Weather you are looking for fly tying materials, books, DVDs, rods, reels, waders or apparel, you simply don’t want to miss The Fly Fishing Show!

Check it out at: www.flyfishingshow.com

Tight Lines,

Colorado Fly Fishing Reports

New Year Resolutions: Fly Fishing

2016 was another great fly fishing year in Colorado. We had wonderful snowpack which kept our rivers cool and our fish happy. The Trout fishing was excellent on all our rivers and we continued to learn more about the sport we truly enjoy. It is the time of year when many folks start making new year resolutions and as we look forward into 2017 there are many achievements we will strive for.  Some are far fetched and others are more realistic. I will spare you the list of 2017 resolutions but will leave you with this one. Continue learning. This year (2016) has been an incredible year of learning and maybe as we’ve get older we’ve started to pay a little more attention, giving us more insight into fly fishing. Regardless of the reasons we will continue to learn as much as we can about the rivers, environment and landscapes we live, work and play in. Not only in 2017 but for years to come. We wish you the best moving into the new year and hope you achieve all your 2017 resolutions. Have a safe and happy new year.

Hoping to see more dry fly eats like this one in the new year. Clip courtesy of Lateral Line Media.

Fly Casting: Adding Distance

Casting a fly rod is certainly a work of art and when done correctly it is amazing the distance you can achieve. Many of us probably believe that we are good if not great fly casters. But, I will be the first to admit that I am not. I can be accurate up to 60 feet but as soon as I try to add more line, my cast gets sloppy. The loop falls apart and my accuracy goes out the window. Now the argument is, that you hardly ever need make a single handed cast longer than 40-50 feet, especially when trout fishing. So why do you need to add more distance? I heard a casting instructor mention that “anyone who says you do not need to cast far means that they cannot.” There is probably quite a bit of truth to that statement and you might be wondering if you are that “guy.” Now lets say you are on a saltwater trip of a lifetime and you need to make a cast at a cursing tarpon or tailing permit and all of a sudden you need to cast and extra 10 – 20 feet of line accurately. Wouldn’t it be nice to be able to complete that task without even thinking about it? Of course it would. This casting video from Orvis dishes out some excellent pointers on how to add distance to your cast. Take a peak and be ready next time to need to make a cast outside your comfort zone.

Fishing Dog with a Blog

There is nothing like being on the river, or on the boat with your four-legged best friend! A good fishing dog can bring a smile to your face, even while fishing is slow & tough. It must not be a coincidence that avid steelhead fishermen seem to always be fishing with their dog?

The author's favorite fishing dog

The author’s favorite fishing dog

Or, if you like to mix it up, you can always try float fishing with your 12 gauge shotgun and Fido while trying to smack some waterfowl outta the sky and stripping rodent sized streamers for angry brown trout! Or bring your pup out on a Colorado grouse hunt as you hike to a mountain lake.

When fishing the high country lakes & streams, a good dog with a pack can help you pack in added supplies like medical kits, water, extra fishing gear, food and even a safety blanket. So if your fishing trips have felt at all lonely lately, try putting a puppy under the Christmas tree this year!

Merry Christmas!

Merry Christmas!

Merry Christmas & Happily Holidays,

Colorado Fly Fishing Reports

 

Only 9 days until Christmas!

With only 9 days until Christmas, it is time to get your Christmas shopping in gear or on Christmas morning you might find yourself looking like Cindy Lou Who…

cindy

And lets face it, Donald Trump is the president elect of the United States and most analysts of the economy are predicting the next great depression, so don’t go spending all your money this holiday season! The good news for fly-fisherman is that there are many “stocking stuffer” gifts that will leave that lucky fly-fisherman in your life beaming from ear to ear with Christmas joy…

Simms Thirsty Trout Keychain. This one is pretty self-explanatory and at just $5.95 it is the gift that keeps on giving for that special fly-fisherman/borderline alcoholic in your life.

Simms Thirsty Trout Keychain $5.95

Simms Thirsty Trout Keychain $5.95

Palsa Pinch on Floats. Pinch on Floats are a great addition to any anglers strike indicator supply and a must have for soft and quiet water where bigger indicators might spook fish. Just $4 at most fishing shops.

Palsa Pinch on Floats.  $4.

Palsa Pinch on Floats. $4.

Loon Top Ride dry shake. Shakes and floats are always something we fly-fisherman seem to be running out of on the stream. Loon makes some of the best “goo” in the business and you can usually find a bottle for $5 to $8 bucks.

Loon Top Ride.  $6.

Loon Top Ride. $6.

Simms Wading Sock. Socks are always something for any serious fisherman and a good pair is a necessity. Simms makes the best wading apparel in the industry and their socks are no different at only $24.95. You could even get creative and use the socks as the actual stocking for your other gifts…

Simms Wading Sock $24.95

Simms Wading Sock $24.95

Orvis Wheatley Fly Box. If you have a bunch of money and it doesn’t really matter if the economy crashes, then one of the most timeless gifts in fishing is a Wheatley Fly Box. There isn’t a more beautiful way to organize and display flies than using a Wheatley box, the basic box usually retails for around $200.

Orvis Wheatley Fly Box

Orvis Wheatley Fly Box

RepYourWater Colorado Flag Hat. Christmas is a great time to get your special fly-fisherman a new lid. And what better way to represent Colorado and fly fishing than a Rep Your Water hat? $25.

RepYourWater Hat.  $25.

RepYourWater Hat. $25.

Abel Nippers. At $85-$165, Abel Nippers are guaranteed to cut any piece of monofilament. Plus, they look pretty dang cool!

Abel Nippers

Abel Nippers

Scientific Anglers Clip on Zinger. Zingers are a tool that any fly-fisherman cannot have too many of! And at around $11 these zingers from SA will not break the bank!

Scientific Anglers Zinger, $11.

Scientific Anglers Zinger, $11.

Simms Big Sky Wallet, nothing celebrates the Holiday Season like spending money on something to hold money, it is the American way. And at around $50, The Simms Big Sky Wallet is a classy looking piece of leather to hold all of your duckets…

Simms Big Sky Wallet, $50.

Simms Big Sky Wallet, $50.

Simms Replacement Laces. A great stocking stuffer idea, as there is nothing more frustrating than being on a fishing trip to find busted or torn laces on your wading boots. Only $4.95!

Simms Replacement Laces, $4.95

Simms Replacement Laces, $4.95

We hope our list of Christmas Stocking Stuffers will help you out in your shopping this Holiday Season!

Tight Lines & Happy Holidays,

Colorado Fly Fishing Reports